Day: July 24, 2017

What is Nutrition?

Nutritional science, or more specifically, human nutrition, refers to studies that explicitly explore the concept of nutrition. Biomedical Egyptology studies report that individuals of African ancestry were pioneers of ancient nutritional science. Take for example, Imhotep the great Egyptian deity of healing or Nefertum the Egyptian god of health and beauty. Currently, most nutritionists describe nutrition as the proper absorption and metabolism of nutrient rich food. Both plants and animals (and every sentient being that falls in-between) has a nutritional requirement. Plants need sunlight, carbon dioxide and water, in an effort to experience cellular growth and development. Humans need a healthy provision of essential nutrients such as amino acids, vitamins and minerals to survive. In an effort to fully understand the concept nutrition, it is important to investigate the discipline of organic chemistry. Three classes of nutrient related substances that we will investigate are amino acids (protein) triacylglycerides (oils and fat) and carbohydrates (sugars). Amino Acids Hair and fingernails are external and visible structures made of proteins, which play an important role in almost all …

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The (modern) Cell Theory.

Cells, which is currently a very common phrase in our society (think cell phones, cellular devices, and…sperm cells) initially described the habitable zones for Christian monks back in the 17th century. However, an inquisitive scientist by the name of Robert Hooke, with the aid of a simple microscope, [mistakenly] gave new meaning to the word cell. While observing the outer the layers of a cork, Hooke identified objects that looked hollow and compact, similar to that of the monks that stayed in the dormitories belonging to the Christian Churches. However, what Hooke was observing was the ‘cell’ wall of a plant, Quercus suber . The image of the plant cell he was observing, lacked a nucleus and any other organelle. Two centuries later, Theodor Schwann, (think Schwann cells) pronounced a unifying theory of cells. He (along with the help from Matthais Schleiden) described plant and animal cells as having a nuclei. In the same  century, scientists also identified other types of cells, this included the egg and germ cells, and a few organelles. Gradually, the word …